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Tips for Taking the Awkward Out of "That Awkward Moment..."

We’ve all seen posts about “The awkward moment when…”. They’re all over Twitter, Facebook, and Tumblr. Some of them are hilarious and some are more shocking. What about the awkward moments that really matter? For example: The moment when a son asks his dad where he can get a condom. The moment a daughter asks her mom what would happen if she got pregnant in high school. The moment a teen asks about what to do if they’re in a bad relationship. These are really important questions that your parents will undoubtedly have an answer for. Most teens say that parents are their biggest influences on what they think about sex, love, and relationships, so at some point you’re probably gonna have a problem that you need to talk to them about.

I’m more comfortable than most teenagers about talking with my parents, if anything ever comes up I would have no problem going to them for help. For those of you who aren’t as comfortable, these are my tips to help you take the awkward out of “The awkward moment when a teen asks about sex, love, and relationships.”

Tip #1:Understand that they’ve been there before. If you have a problem, they probably had the same one when they were young. Got a question? They probably asked the same thing. They’re more experienced, so remember: there’s no shame in rookies getting some tips from the pros.

Tip #2:Remember that it’s not lame to ask your parents. What would you say are your biggest influences on your thoughts about sex and relationships? The media? Your friends? In fact, most teen say that their parents are the biggest influence on their views on sex and relationships, so don’t worry about it not being cool because chances are, your friends have asked their parents about something too.

Tip #3:Keep in mind that it’s worth it. If this little talk saves you from getting someone pregnant/ getting pregnant, then those few moments of awkwardness will all be worth your while.

Tip #4:Don’t make a big deal of it, because it’s not. It really isn’t a big deal to ask—you’re not supposed to be an expert at these things. Just pull your mom or dad aside, as opposed to having this conversation at the dinner table in front of the rest of the family. Don’t freak out.  Talk to them like you would as if you were asking for help on homework or anything else. It isn’t a big deal, so don’t treat it like one.

Tip #5: Just do it. I’m not trying to sound like a Nike ad here, but come one, what’s the worst that could happen? It may be a little embarrassing, but you’ll have to ask about this stuff eventually, so why not now? After all, there’s no time like the present. What are you doing still reading this blog post? If you have a question, then go ask your parents!

Well, did I help? I hope I did, at least a little. So now, if you’ve got a problem, then put these tips to use and go ask your parents.

Author: Emerson M.
Teenagers sitting on a tree limb

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